Bookmark and Share

"Balancing Safety, Convenience and Privacy in the Era of Ubiquitous Cameras," a Presentation from Intel

Register or sign in to access the Embedded Vision Academy's free technical training content.

The training materials provided by the Embedded Vision Academy are offered free of charge to everyone. All we ask in return is that you register, and tell us a little about yourself so that we can understand a bit about our audience. As detailed in our Privacy Policy, we will not share your registration information, nor contact you, except with your consent.

Registration is free and takes less than one minute. Click here to register, and get full access to the Embedded Vision Academy's unique technical training content.

If you've already registered, click here to sign in.

See a sample of this page's content below:


Charlotte Dryden, Director of the Visual Computing Developer Solutions team at Intel, presents the "Balancing Safety, Convenience and Privacy in the Era of Ubiquitous Cameras" tutorial at the May 2018 Embedded Vision Summit.

Computer vision-enabled cameras are proliferating rapidly and will soon be ubiquitous – in, on and around vehicles, homes, toys, stores, public transit, schools, restaurants and more. Clearly, this offers tremendous benefits in terms of safety, security, convenience and efficiency. But what about privacy? Are we doomed to give up our privacy as cameras proliferate? Possibly, but not necessarily. Many of the same technologies that are fueling the proliferation of visual intelligence can also be used to enhance privacy, if product developers choose to do so, and if consumers, enterprises and governments prioritize privacy.

For example, accelerating innovation in sensors means that system designers have many choices of sensor types beyond the typical CMOS image sensor, enabling engineers to choose sensor types that capture only the information that is required for the application. And rapid progress in embedded processors – combined with efficient, accurate algorithms – makes it increasingly feasible to consume images at the edge or in the fog, and then discard them, retaining only the required meta-data. In this talk, Dryden explores trade-offs related to privacy in a world filled with connected cameras.